Thursday, March 16, 2017

New! Hyper-local Neighborhood Colleges.

For more right now see http://www.GrassrootsRules.us. Join us Friday afternoon?

Friday, March 10, 2017

Today's IDEA Cafe Twitter Chat

Join us at 10 a.m. today or any morning Monday through Friday. Video starts Monday. Today go to Twitter @IDEACafeChat, post using #IDEACafeChat to be part of the conversation.

Wednesday, March 08, 2017

On Women and Work. Intl Women's Day.

March 8, 2017, International Women’s Day

On Women and Work.
by John S. Wren

Denver— I have three adult daughters, lots of friends who are women, and before he passed on in 1979 my dad and I had frequent disagreements about his oppressive opinions about women and work, so I’m very glad this day has been set aside to reflect on the role of women. 



When I was President of Denver City Club we admitted our first woman to membership. This was back when the Denver Rotary, Lions Club, Optimists, and the rest of the service clubs were men only, and women had just begun to be admitted in other cities across the country.

Not long after admitting Doris Drury, my former economics prof at the University of Denver, Debbie, our first woman board member, was elected, and she was asked to be the program chair.

Valentines Day had always been celebrated by the club, and the program chair announced at a board meeting the speakers who had been invited and their topics: President of a Bank, Women in Business; CEO of a hospital, Women in Medicine; and President of a College, Women in Education.

I asked, “what about women as homemakers?” It seemed like a set-up to invite our wives, most of who worked as full-time homemakers, to celebrate Valentines Day with a program about professional women who worked outside the home. But the program went forward as announced.

After the three speakers had highlighted the vast accomplishments of professional women the floor was opened for questions and I asked the first:

“All three of you have talked about your outstanding careers and you have each also mentioned you are married and have children. My question is this, what has been sacrificed the most because of your limited time, your family or your work?”

Outrage was then displayed, shouts it was not a fair question, shaking of fingers at me, the moderator going to the microphone said, “you certainly don’t have to answer that!!!, other questions?”



One of the older men in the club stood and said, “I’d like to hear the question answered. That’s exactly the sort of question this club has always asked. It seems like a fair question to me.”

Pop and I had disagreed about mothers working outside the home. He thought it was being encouraged by big business because doubling the labor force and would cut wages in half.

“You wait,” pop said, “right now women want to work. It won’t be long before they will have to work because it will take two paychecks to support a family.” 

Turns out pop was right.

And as we look at the problems in the world today, the answer to my question to the City Club speakers is now clear: the family has been sacrificed.

Monday, March 06, 2017

New! SBCC Twitter Chat. Can you hear us now?

Just started last week, started with a boom! Lots of traffic, all we need now are your comments on topic for the day. Check it out, then call me at (303)861-1447 if you'd like to co-host one day next week.

John Wren's Twitter Chat
Small Business Chamber of Commerce
Topic announced each morning on
www.SmallBizChamber.org

Thursday, February 09, 2017

Today, who do you trust?

Why academics are losing relevance in society – and how to stop it


Andrew J. Hoffman, University of Michigan

A January 2015 Pew Research Center study found an alarming chasm between the views of scientists and the views of the public. Here is just a sampling:

87 percent of scientists accept that natural selection plays a role in evolution, 32 percent of the public agree; 88 percent of scientists think that genetically modified foods are safe to eat, 37 percent of the public agree; 87 percent of scientists think that climate change is mostly due to human activity, only 50 percent of the public agree.

This is a cause for concern. In our increasingly technological world, issues like nanotechnology, stem cell research, nuclear power, climate change, vaccines and autism, genetically modified organisms, gun control, health care and endocrine disruption require thoughtful and informed debate. But instead, these and other issues have often been caught up in the so-called culture wars.