Faculty Club 4-Week Study Group, 1st 6 to rsvp only.

Saturday, July 28, 2007

Mary and I saw the opening of Barefoot in the Park last night at the Victorian Theatre in North Denver. www.DenverWhenWhere.com. Near the end of the play, after the new husband has stormed out of the apartment, the mother gives advice to her newly wed daughter when she asks,

I don't know what he wants.
I don't know how to make him happy.
What am I going to do, Mother?

That's the first time you've asked my advice
since you were 10.
It's really very simple.
All you have to do
is give up a little bit of you for him.
Don't make everything a game,
just late at night in that little room upstairs,
take care of him.
Make him feel...
important.
If you can do that,
you'll have a happy and wonderful marriage,
like 2 out of every 10 couples.
You'll be one of the two, baby.
Now get out of here and go find him.

Friday, July 27, 2007

Happier-- Learn the Secrets to Daily Joy and Lasting Fulfillment
Tal Ben-Shahar, Ph.D.
www.talbenshahar.com"It is easy to see how this is the backbone of the most popular course at Harvard University today." Martin E.P. Seligman, author of Learned Optimism.

Ben-Shahar recommends meditation and a spirital orientation for finding more happiness. Those who are open to that approach might also find this useful:

The Way of Ignatius

A five-day programme of prayer
to lead you a little deeper into Ignatian spirituality

Tuesday 31st July is the Feast of St Ignatius of Loyola, who founded the Society of Jesus (the Jesuits) in 1540, with nine companions.

Last year, for the week running up to the Feast of St Ignatius, Pray-as-you-go, the Jesuit website, took the form of a five-day "Novena" (using the term a little loosely!) - a programme of meditations in the Ignatian tradition, with each day building on the previous one, allowing the user to go a little deeper than is usually possible with the short, daily prayer sessions.

This year Pray-as-you-go has chosen to make this programme available again, but now as a permanent feature, separate from the daily sessions.

The five prayer sessions are available at http://www.pray-as-you-go.org/wayofignatius.htm in MP3 and WMA format, separately or in a single ZIP file.

If you decide to do this, please email me at JohnSWren@aol.com and let me know, so that I can pray for you, OK? And please pray for me as I am doing it starting this morning, looking for guidance in my work and engagement & marrage with Mary.

Thursday, July 26, 2007

Why the scourge of alcoholism defies a cure--
30 percent of Americans abuse alcohol


By Howard Witt | Chicago Tribune senior correspondent
July 25, 2007

More than 30 percent of American adults have abused alcohol or suffered from alcoholism at some point in their lives, according to a new study released this month by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, a branch of the National Institutes of Health.

Yet only a quarter of those afflicted received any treatment. And other studies show that, at best, only a quarter of those who seek treatment manage to abstain from alcohol for a year.

"Alcohol problems are not just something that affects Hollywood stars," said Dr. Robert Swift, a psychiatrist at Brown University who specializes in alcoholism. "We're talking about a chronic, relapsing condition. And we still have a long way to go in treatment. It's like treatment of cancer-some people can be helped but others just cannot."


I took my last drink 11 years ago, my life (and the lives of many others) would have been much better if I'd never taken my first drink at that fraternity party in April, 1967. I just found this help for making the decision about drinking advertised in AOL pop-up ad: http://www.family.samhsa.gov/stop/
Why the scourge of alcoholism defies a cure--
30 percent of Americans abuse alcohol


By Howard Witt | Chicago Tribune senior correspondent
July 25, 2007

More than 30 percent of American adults have abused alcohol or suffered from alcoholism at some point in their lives, according to a new study released this month by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, a branch of the National Institutes of Health.

Yet only a quarter of those afflicted received any treatment. And other studies show that, at best, only a quarter of those who seek treatment manage to abstain from alcohol for a year.

"Alcohol problems are not just something that affects Hollywood stars," said Dr. Robert Swift, a psychiatrist at Brown University who specializes in alcoholism. "We're talking about a chronic, relapsing condition. And we still have a long way to go in treatment. It's like treatment of cancer-some people can be helped but others just cannot."

Sunday, July 22, 2007

Dan Haley writing in the Denver Post this morning says the Mayor is right, the homelessness problem in Denver is better:

The mall is downtown's backbone and a top tourist attraction, but for years strolling it was often a hassle.

Aggressive panhandlers would get in your face, shaking you down for cash to feed a booze habit or an empty stomach. The passive panhandlers, those who simply held a sign to tell their tale of woe, weren't much of a problem, but the guilt of passing them by could be taxing.

And even though social workers tell you never to give them a dime, I'll confess to digging into my pocket on a few occasions - either to make them go away or to make the pangs of guilt ebb.

But it's different this summer.

I hadn't actually realized it - remember, I was trying not to look in the first place - until Denver Mayor John Hickenlooper mentioned it in his inaugural address last week.

"In just two years, the number of chronically homeless individuals in Denver decreased by 36 percent," the mayor said, "and panhandling on the 16th Street Mall decreased by 92 percent."


http://test.denverpost.com/headlines/ci_6418292

What do you think? Does it seem to you that the problem with street people in Denver is better? Or is this just another example of a Denver newspaper serving up J-Hic propoganda rather than reporting the facts?